May/June/July

posted 15 Jul 2012, 03:39 by Debbie Johnson

Time does fly when you are enjoying yourself! Or so they say. It has certainly flown past probably because we have a had a busy two months, with orphans, talks and fundraising we haven’t had time to breathe. I would like to thank Sue and Dave for all their hard work over the last few months helping with fundraising, printing, and raising orphans, it is very much appreciated.

May saw our total of fox cubs this year rise to 18- nearly as many as last year, all but 4 have been released now. We still have Scooby our bald cub from Bedfordshire- its going to be a while until he is ready to go, a very thin, emaciated little girl cub, who is on intensive feeding at the moment so cannot go in with the others. Once she is well enough i will be able to put her out with Scooby and then the other two will be able to go.

Also in May we met the Groombridge Brownies, and introduced them to our work and some of our babies, they thoroughly enjoyed the evening. We had numerous fundraising events to attend and a BIG thank you to the following for their invites. Lingfield Marathon, Groombridge School, Fernmore School, Merriest Wood College, Crowborough Town, Paradise Park, Newhaven, Smallfield Village Fete, Crowborough Bonfire Society, Cats Protection Chelwood Gate. We are grateful for your interest in our organisation and have helped us to raise over £1000 for the animals.

May and June were busy months for baby birds, although we try and encourage you to leave the baby birds where they are unless they are in immediate danger, very young with no feathers,  or injured, we had a lot of calls and birds brought in. I readily admit this is not my area and without Sue this year i would not have been able to take so many. She looked after most of them and got most of them back into the wild. As well as the usual garden birds we had a kestrel chick, a Canada Goose gosling and a little owl chick, these i can cope with, and i am happy to say have all been released.

On June 12th we had our first Fallow fawn, she was attacked by a dog, but luckily not badly, she had been bitten at the base of the neck and was unable to raise her head for a week, after pain relief and massage, she is now fully recovered and you wouldn’t know anything had happened to her. We called her Rosie- she likes rose petals. On 29th June our second one came in another little girl, this time had been caught in stock fencing. She has terrible ligature wounds on her hind legs and abdomen, she has been in awful pain and discomfort but is still fighting. The wounds on a ligature wound sometimes don’t show their true colours for at least 10days it is on ly then that we can see the true damage done. They may look ok to start with but it is frightening how deep the tissue damage can go and it is only after a week or so that this shows. This is why it is important if you come across an animal caught in fencing to call for help if you just release the animal it could run off and die a horrible painful death. 

I have attached our latest news letter for you to  read.

 

 

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Debbie Johnson,
15 Jul 2012, 03:40
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Debbie Johnson,
15 Jul 2012, 03:39
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